McDonald's to Use Snapchat to Hire Workers in the US

HIGHLIGHTS

  • McDonald’s will hire some US workers this summer through Snapchat
  • About 250,000 people will be hired across its US restaurants
  • The chain started accepting “Snaplications” in Australia last month

In its bid to attract young applicants, American fast-food chain McDonald’s will hire some US workers this summer through the photo-sharing app Snapchat.

The world’s largest burger chain said the company and its franchisees will hire about 250,000 people across its US restaurants for what is usually one of its busiest seasons of the year, the Chicago Tribune reported.

The chain started accepting “Snaplications” in Australia last month, allowing potential employees to make video submissions with a special filter that shows them wearing a McDonald’s uniform.

“We thought Snaplications was a great way to allow us to meet job seekers where they are – their phones,” Jez Langhorn, McDonald’s Senior Director of Human Resources in the US was quoted as saying.

McDonald's to Use Snapchat to Hire Workers in the US

The video audition could be submitted to McDonald’s Snapchat account after which McDonald’s would send back a link to the application and digital careers page for a formal application.

McDonald’s said that allowing applications through Snapchat will aid hiring efforts because many of its applicants are between the ages of 16 and 24.

This is incidentally the prime user group of the photo sharing platform. The company is also set to use other platforms like Spotify and Hulu to reach potential job seekers.

Snapchat Sued by Teen Over Sexy Discover Stories

Snapchat Sued by Teen Over Sexy Discover Stories

A 14-year-old boy and his mother have filed a lawsuit against Snapchat, alleging that the photo-and video-sharing app’s Discover service routinely exposes minors to sexually explicit content without warning them or their parents, a media report said.

The lawsuit, filed on Thursday by celebrity lawyer Mark Geragos in US District Court for Central California, accusesSnapchat of violating the Communications Decency Act, a 1996 law intended to regulate pornographic material on the internet.

The complaint alleges that the unnamed boy was exposed to Disney characters in sexually explicit conditions as part of a photo collage titled ’23 Pictures That Are Too Real If You’ve Ever Had Sex With A Penis’ served up on the Discover channels from BuzzFeed, technology website CNET.com reported on Thursday.

The lawsuit specifically focuses on Discover, which was launched in January 2015 to serve editorial and multimedia content from major brands such as BuzzFeed, Fusion, MTV and Cosmopolitan.

“We haven’t been served with a complaint in this lawsuit, but we are sorry if people were offended. Our Discover partners have editorial independence, which is something that we support,” cnet.com quoted a Snapchat spokesman as saying.

The lawsuit, which seeks class-action status, seeks civil penalties as well as an in-app warning about the possible sexual content, the report added.

Snapchat Memories Will Let You Save Photos

Snapchat Memories Will Let You Save Photos, Videos

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Memories is an album within where users can save photos and videos
  • They can later be uploaded as a Story, a slide show of contents
  • Stories disappear 24 hours after they are uploaded

Snapchat announced a new feature that enables users to save and share their content, a big change for the popular social messaging app widely used for sending photos and videos that disappear in a day.

The new feature, called “Memories,” is an album within the app where users can save photos and videos which they can later upload to their “Story,” a slide show of contents that disappears after 24 hours. Until now, photos and videos had to be immediately uploaded after being recorded.

The move could signal that Snapchat, known for immediacy, spontaneity and simplicity, is taking a shot at more mainstream social networks like Facebook .

In recent years Snapchat added advertising and sponsored contents as the company’s valuation grew to around $18 billion.

Its user base has also gotten older, with nearly 40 percent of users now aged between 25 – 34 in the United States. About 14 percent of users are above 35, according to digital measurer comScore.

“It’s fun to celebrate an anniversary or birthday by finding a few old snaps and stringing them together into a new story,” Snapchat said in the announcement made on its blog on Wednesday.

Snapchat has 150 million daily users, according to a Bloomberg report last month, surpassing Twitter , which has less than 140 million daily users.