iPad Pro 2017 Models Outperform New MacBook Pro Models in Some Benchmarks

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The benchmark tests pitted new iPad Pro models against MacBook Pro
  • The 10.5-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro models were included in the test
  • Benchmark also included 2016 MacBook Pro models

Apple’s new iPad Pro models are as capable as the refreshed MacBook Pro models, matching, and even surpassing the laptops in certain benchmarks. Bare Feats, a benchmarking blog, posted some CPU and GPU test results that pitted the 2017 MacBook Pro models against the new iPad Pro 12.9 inch and 10.5-inch models.

The devices were tested with a series of benchmark tests like GeekBench and GFXBench giving an idea about the CPU and GPU performance of the new iPad Pro and MacBook Pro models. The tests also included older 2016 MacBook Pro and iPad Pro models to get a better idea about the improvements that the new hardware brings to the hotel.

In terms of GPU performance, the new iPad Pro models outperform the MacBook Pro (2016 and 2017) models in Geekbench 4 Compute Metal test. The test results showed the 10.5-inch iPad Pro model scoring 27,814, and was closely followed by 12.9-inch iPad Pro which scored 27,597. MacBook Pro 2016 and 2017 models came third and fourth with a score of 27,631 and 26,353 respectively.

In the single-core GeekBench 4 tests, the all-new MacBook Pro 13-inch was seen scoring 4,650, which outperformed the new iPad Pro models which scored around 4,000 mark. Though, the test also saw that the 12.9-inch and 10.5-inch iPad Pro models scores were on par with the older MacBook Pro models.iPad Pro 2017 Models Outperform New MacBook Pro Models in Some Benchmarks

In the multi-core CPU tests, the 2017 MacBook Pro models yet again outperformed all the iPad Pro models with a stunning score of 10,261. The new iPad Pro models, however, beat the 2016 MacBook Pro models, which can be seen as a big improvement for the tablets.

The benchmark scores may indicate that the new iPad Pro models can match CPU and GPU performance of MacBook Pro though we want to stress that these scores aren’t indicative of real-world usage usage.

To recall, Apple refreshed the 12.9-inch iPad Pro model at the WWDC 2017, and also launched the new 10.5-inch iPad Pro. The company also refreshed the entire MacBook lineup, including a new 13-Inch MacBook Pro configuration.

Apple iPad Pro (10.5-inch) Wi-Fi

Apple iPad Pro (10.5-inch) Wi-Fi

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

10.50-inch

Front Camera

7-megapixel

Resolution

2224×1668 pixels

OS

iOS 10

Storage

64GB

Rear Camera

12-megapixel

Also See
  • Apple iPad Pro (9.7-inch, Wi-Fi, Space Grey, 32GB) MLMN2HN/A Space Gray –
    Rs. 43,496
  • Apple iPad Pro (9.7-inch) Wi-Fi (Space Grey, 32GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 47,405
  • Apple iPad Pro (9.7-inch) Wi-Fi (Rose Gold, 32GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 47,405
Apple iPad Pro (12.9-inch) 2017 Wi-Fi

Apple iPad Pro (12.9-inch) 2017 Wi-Fi

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

12.90-inch

Front Camera

7-megapixel

Resolution

2732×2048 pixels

OS

iOS 10

Storage

64GB

Rear Camera

12-megapixel

Also See
  • Apple iPad Pro (9.7-inch, Wi-Fi, Space Grey, 32GB) MLMN2HN/A Space Gray –
    Rs. 43,496
  • Apple iPad Pro (9.7-inch) Wi-Fi (Space Grey, 32GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 47,405
  • Apple iPad Pro (9.7-inch) Wi-Fi (Rose Gold, 32GB) – OFFER
    Rs. 47,405

Warning! Ransomware Attacks Against Businesses Up 500 Percent In Some States

A new report from Malwarebytes released today shows a dramatic increase in the number of malware attacks U.S. small businesses face.  In fact, 90 percent of small to medium sized businesses reported increased malware detection in Q1 2017 over Q1 2016. A 500 percent increase in ransomware alone was detected in March of this year in ten states.

Ransomware Attacks Are Increasing

All 50 states suffered through a spike in malware detections. In other alarming news, 15 states had their total number of incidents quadruple. Small Business Trends talked with Adam Kujawa,  Director of Malware Intelligence at Malwarebytes and Justin Dolly, EVP, Chief Security Officer and CIO of Malwarebytes. They talked about the latest trends and the types of threats to small businesses highlighted in the report.

Big Problem in the Small Business World

“Ransomware has been a big problem in the SMB world and that has not changed,”  Kujawa says. “We’ve seen a 231 percent increase in incidences between Q1 2016 and Q1 2017.”

Adware is another persistent threat to small business. Kujawa says this is the most prolific malware businesses need to battle at least in part because it constantly changes to evade detection. Arizona had the most striking numbers with a year over year increase of 1774.42 percent. Maine, Alaska and Hawaii followed suit with exponential increases.

Small Businesses Vulnerable

Small businesses are left especially vulnerable. They often don’t have the money to buy the more involved solutions bigger companies and corporations have.  Kujawa says cybercriminals are well aware of this small business Achilles Heel. They often exploit it through creating “spoof” emails that pose as legitimate third party vendors and even banks. These phony emails often contain the malware that gets activated when opened.

“The most prevalent method of distributing malware is through email,” Kujawa says, adding it’s also a common method for small businesses to reach out to third parties.

No Way! Ransomware Attacks Are Increasing Against Businesses Up 500 Percent In Some States

A Layered Approach

Dolly suggests one way for small businesses to combat malware is to understand how to get to the root of the problem. He says having a layered approach to stay ahead of malware variations works. Taking advantage of the latest technology is an important part of the mix.

“For example,” he says, ” a cloud platform should allow small to medium sized businesses to manage all of the end points that could have malware bytes installed.”

High Risk Industries

According to the report, Maine had the the highest rate of malware detection per 100 endpoints. Some of the highest risk industries included retail, tourism and healthcare. These endpoints refer to the laptops, desktops, smartphones and other devices that connect to a network.

The report’s  data was collected from  millions of small to medium sized business computers protected by products from Malwarebytes. There were four types of malware studied — spyware, ransomware, adware and botnets. The study ran from  January 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017.

 

China Shuts Some Live Streaming Sites, Punishes Companies

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Almost half of China’s Internet users use live video streaming sites
  • The live broadcasting market was worth CNY 21 billion in 2016
  • Ministry of Culture said that it had shut down 10 hosting platforms

Chinese authorities have punished dozens of companies involved in live online broadcasting and shut down numerous hosting platforms for showing content that was pornographic, related to gambling or involved content considered superstitious and harmful to minors.

Almost half of China’s 730 million Internet users use live video streaming sites and apps, according to authorities. The live broadcasting market was worth CNY 21 billion ($3 billion or roughly Rs. 19,733 crores) in 2016, an increase of 180 percent from the year before, according to market research company iResearch.

China Shuts Some Live Streaming Sites, Punishes Companies

In its latest crackdown on the industry, the Ministry of Culture said Wednesday that it had shut down 10 hosting platforms and given administrative punishments, including fines, to 48 companies. It also said it had ordered closed more than 30,000 studios producing content. Most individuals’ studios consist of their bedroom or living room, but there are some businesses set up to provide multiple broadcast spaces.

The ministry said it had also given out punishments including unspecified fines and the confiscation of “illegal earnings” in relation to more than 30,000 broadcasts. A total of 547 people have had broadcasting contracts terminated.

 

It said a well-known platform, Huajiao, was punished for broadcasting a live show earlier this month in which the host falsely claimed she was in Beijing’s Forbidden City after closing time. The show was actually made in a studio.

Live broadcasting websites and mobile apps have offered money-making opportunities to students and others who chat, play games, dance or offer other entertainment online. The audience at home can pay them via virtual gifts, and the hosting platforms take a cut.

Authorities have in the past handed down penalties to platforms, saying they have been found broadcasting pornographic and other objectionable content. They are increasingly bringing out rules for the industry, including requiring platforms to obtain government licenses and hosts to register with their real names.